I have noticed that a lot of people in BMX are getting married. I was wondering what your thoughts are on the topic. I see marriage as being able to support another person mentally, physically, emotionally, and financially. But how can that last one be because we always hear that BMX is not made for making money but riding for the love of it. So how does that all work?–Jordan Horras

Well, I don’t know where you got the idea that BMX isn’t made for making money. Obviously, you haven’t seen the BMX superstars on MTV Cribs these days; there’s definitely money to be made in BMX. For me personally, I think I’m at the best spot I could be in. I make enough money to earn a living without having to have a job, and yet I still love riding my bike more than anything else I could think of (besides my wife, of course). I’m far from rich, but I’ve always believed that loving what you do for a living is one of the most important things in life. Way more important than the size of your paycheck.–Dave

When is Baco 10 coming out?–Chris Abraham

Baco 10 is nearly finished is I type this, so by the time you read this, it’ll be available.–Dave

What is your favorite ramp trick so far, and how long did it take for you to land it? Thanks and you kicked ass on the Etnies video.–No name given

First of all, thanks for the good words. As far as my favorite trick goes, I couldn’t even begin to pick just one. I think I could pick my favorite video part or maybe a contest I rode at, but I’ve never really done one thing that stands out enough to be “my favorite so far.” I guess if I could generalize a bit, I’d have to say tailwhips, just because of how amazing they feel when you do one just right.–Dave

You rip; I saw you at Roots Jam and those alley-oop whips you were doing from wall to wedge were just sick. What other tricks do you do with tailwhips?–Mike

Downside, tailtaps, disasters...but alley-oop ones are definitely my favorite. They feel so much like a 360 whip sometimes.–Dave

You’re one of the most tech riders out there; where do you get inspiration to do these tech bangers?–No name given

Well, it’s actually pretty easy. First, I start with the invisible halfpipe and slowly work my way up to the foam pit. After that, it’s the resi-pit and then on my way to the skatepark. Baby steps, it’s all about those baby steps.–Dave

How do you do those spectacular toothpick stalls? I can’t quite get them. Any help would be appreciated.–No name given

I’ve never heard anyone describe my toothpicks as spectacular, but I’ll take it; thanks. The only advice I could really give you is to get all your weight over the front of your bike. I think it’s when you’re completely above your front peg that you have the most control of what you’re doing. Besides, nothing looks weaker than a toothpick with your back wheel hanging below your front. Good luck.–Dave

You are best known for your tech ramp skills. This always led me to believe that you probably rode a smaller bike (20-inch top tube), but I believe your signature frame is a 21-inch top tube. Does the longer top tube seem to help you out in any way leverage wise, or do you just enjoy the added room?–No name given

I’d have to say it’s the added room. I was actually pretty comfortable on Ruben’s frame (20-3/4 inches), but I’m four or five inches taller than he is, so I thought I’d try a bit longer frame. When I switched, I could barely tell the difference. I’ve always thought that it’s more about how you set up your bike than the actual geometry of it. Bars back, shorter stem, snake post, wheel all the way forward, Rotor instead of a Gyro…–Dave

Can you do tailwhips both ways? If you can, will you please give me some of your skills?–No name given

You don’t want my skills… I actually tried to do tailwhips the opposite way a long time ago, and was the most foreign feeling ever. I’ve always felt that if a trick feels that strange to me, I have no business doing it, so I’ve never tried since.–Dave

What was it like riding for Huffy? I never saw any of their frames that didn’t look like it wasn’t going to snap in half. Has riding with Jay Miron and Alistair Whitton and John Heaton made you any better?–Keith, New Jersey

Riding for Huffy really wasn’t too bad. Besides summer tour, we pretty much got to do whatever we wanted, and the guys I got to ride and travel with were the best. As far as the bikes go, most of us rode custom frames they made just for us. I think Cory and TL may have actually ridden stock frames, but I’m not sure. Riding with guys as good as Jay, Ali, and John can only push you to ride better. I wish I could ride with them on a daily basis.–Dave

I was just wondering when Area 51 is going to be done? When is Baco 10 coming out?–Robert King

We’re working at the new Area 51 right now. In fact, Aaron Bostrom, Axel Jurgens, and Kevin Porter are all in town this week helping out. Our goal right now is to be done by the end of November, but I really want to have a bunch of stuff ridable by the time everyone comes to town for the Baco tour in mid-November. Baco 10 is sitting on my computer right now without an intro and half of a credits section, so it may still be a few weeks. Please be patient; I guarantee that if you’re a fan of Baco videos, you’ll love 10.–Dave
{Ed. note: Baco 10 should be available very soon...}

I should start by saying that Style Cats was the video that got me riding (again), and your section was one of my favorites. Have you ever been sitting there and suddenly realize that you are so good, causing a spontaneous fit of tears? You have been riding for a long time as a Pro, and have been doing the tech bangers since chrome-plating was cool. Is there any maneuver that you have not been able to pull (that you actually wanted to)?–Marcus Davis

Wow, I’m psyched that I had something to do with you starting to ride again. That’s amazing. No, I’ve never cried because I’m so good. As far as tricks that I haven’t been able to do… Nothing I can think of right now. Usually if I want to learn it, I won’t stop until I do it. There are a few things I’ve been working on lately that haven’t happened yet, but hopefully they aren’t far away. Actually, now that I think of it, double tailwhips would probably top the list. I’ve only tried them a handful of times and got my ass kicked each time, so I’ve kind of given up.–Dave

Were tailwhips easy for you to learn? How did you learn them?–No name given

Actually, tailwhips came pretty easily to me. Believe it or not, I think I had a tougher time with barspins. I first learned whips flying out of a four-foot quarter. Kind of like landing on the top of a box jump. I think the ones that are the easiest for me now are six-foot elbow hips, probably because they’re more like an air than a jump.–Dave

Have you been to New Zealand?–No name given

No, but I’ve been dying to go. Ruben told me that New Zealand was probably his favorite stop on their world tour.–Dave

You are one of the most innovative riders out there. How do you come up with the tricks and lines you do, and does flatland have an impact on your riding? Peace.–Pat Buchanan, San Jose, California

I can’t really say how I come up with my stuff. I just see things that I want to do when I get to a park or street course, or when I’m sitting around thinking about riding, new stuff pops into my head sometimes. Flatland used to have an impact on my riding, but it really doesn’t anymore. I honestly stopped paying attention to flatland quite a while ago. It’s so crazy now, it almost seems like its own separate sport these days.–Dave

What advice do you have for a rider who is pretty good and wants to get sponsored?–Russ Stippich

I think one of the most helpful things you can do to get sponsored is make a sponsor-me video. That way, if you really have the skills, it’ll be obvious to potential sponsors. Do that, and go to contests and other places where people can see you ride and get to know you. There are so many good kids these days that a lot of companies won’t even think of sponsoring someone until they know them personally. I’ve seen a few different times in the last year or so alone when a company sponsored a rider on riding ability alone, only to find out that he was a complete dickhead that they’d never want to represent their company.–Dave

Whip-to-disaster in Orlando, Florida.  credit: Jeff Zielinski

In the Etnies Forward video, did you hit the lamppost after pulling the feeble on the big blue ledge?–James Hunt

No.–Dave

I can do 360 tailtaps on flat ground, but every time I try them on a ramp or anything else I stop spinning. How do you keep the spin going?–No name given

Joe Hurlburt was probably one of the best guys I’ve ever had the pleasure to ride with. He taught me more about riding in the couple years we got to ride together than I’ve learned in my whole life. He actually helped me with this very same problem. You’re probably not turning your head over your shoulder the way you are spinning. Whenever you spin, you need to turn your head into it. Turn your head and your body will follow.–Dave

It seems it takes some people longer to learn new stuff and others just pick it up real quick. Sometimes it takes a while to get a trick but usually I keep trying even if I fall a few times, but I never like to push myself. Some of the things people do on bikes these days is crazy and I wouldn’t imagine doing it. It almost seems like you have to push yourself to learn new tricks, and even my friends have pushed me to learn new stuff; I never thought I would learn to backflip last summer, but thanks to my friends at camp pushing me to learn them I did. It did take a while and lots of wrecks. So why do you think some people just seem to pick tricks up so naturally? Thanks.–Gonde

I have no idea. I see it all the time. There’s guys like Jim Cielencki that seem to have ten new tricks every time you see them, and then there’s guys that never seem to learn a new trick, but just keep doing the same old stuff bigger and better every day. I just think it’s their own personal motivation. Whatever turns their cranks.–Dave

Will you ever have a signature shoe with Etnies?–Will Blount, Memphis, Tennessee

There’s never been any talk about a Freimuth signature shoe as far as I know. Maybe if you write or email Etnies, it’ll speed up the process…hehe!–Dave

What’s the correct way to spell your name? I’ve seen it spelled two different ways on the same web site, and I think it’s spelled wrong in your etnies ad. Please set the record straight once and for all. Also, what kind of rear hub do you use? I heard it was a 13-year-old coaster brake with some high-tech crap on the inside that only three riders on the planet can get? If this is true, how do you get such old-fashioned and high-tech stuff to last all these years?–McGoo

My name is spelled D-A-V-E. That’s a funny story about my rear hub, I’ve never heard that one. You’re probably thinking I run an old Suntour coaster brake hub with an unbrake in it. I actually used to, but now I’ve been running the Odyssey Hazard Freecoaster hub. It’s not perfect, but it’s by far the best freecoaster I’ve used. Sealed bearings, big axle, fully-loaded…thanks, Jim Bauer.–Dave

Dave, you are awesome! You have been riding longer than I have be sponsored?–Russ Stippich

I think one of the most helpful things you can do to get sponsored is make a sponsor-me video. That way, if you really have the skills, it’ll be obvious to potential sponsors. Do that, and go to contests and other places where people can see you ride and get to know you. There are so many good kids these days that a lot of companies won’t even think of sponsoring someone until they know them personally. I’ve seen a few different times in the last year or so alone when a company sponsored a rider on riding ability alone, only to find out that he was a complete dickhead that they’d never want to represent their company.–Dave

Whip-to-disaster in Orlando, Florida.  credit: Jeff Zielinski

In the Etnies Forward video, did you hit the lamppost after pulling the feeble on the big blue ledge?–James Hunt

No.–Dave

I can do 360 tailtaps on flat ground, but every time I try them on a ramp or anything else I stop spinning. How do you keep the spin going?–No name given

Joe Hurlburt was probably one of the best guys I’ve ever had the pleasure to ride with. He taught me more about riding in the couple years we got to ride together than I’ve learned in my whole life. He actually helped me with this very same problem. You’re probably not turning your head over your shoulder the way you are spinning. Whenever you spin, you need to turn your head into it. Turn your head and your body will follow.–Dave

It seems it takes some people longer to learn new stuff and others just pick it up real quick. Sometimes it takes a while to get a trick but usually I keep trying even if I fall a few times, but I never like to push myself. Some of the things people do on bikes these days is crazy and I wouldn’t imagine doing it. It almost seems like you have to push yourself to learn new tricks, and even my friends have pushed me to learn new stuff; I never thought I would learn to backflip last summer, but thanks to my friends at camp pushing me to learn them I did. It did take a while and lots of wrecks. So why do you think some people just seem to pick tricks up so naturally? Thanks.–Gonde

I have no idea. I see it all the time. There’s guys like Jim Cielencki that seem to have ten new tricks every time you see them, and then there’s guys that never seem to learn a new trick, but just keep doing the same old stuff bigger and better every day. I just think it’s their own personal motivation. Whatever turns their cranks.–Dave

Will you ever have a signature shoe with Etnies?–Will Blount, Memphis, Tennessee

There’s never been any talk about a Freimuth signature shoe as far as I know. Maybe if you write or email Etnies, it’ll speed up the process…hehe!–Dave

What’s the correct way to spell your name? I’ve seen it spelled two different ways on the same web site, and I think it’s spelled wrong in your etnies ad. Please set the record straight once and for all. Also, what kind of rear hub do you use? I heard it was a 13-year-old coaster brake with some high-tech crap on the inside that only three riders on the planet can get? If this is true, how do you get such old-fashioned and high-tech stuff to last all these years?–McGoo

My name is spelled D-A-V-E. That’s a funny story about my rear hub, I’ve never heard that one. You’re probably thinking I run an old Suntour coaster brake hub with an unbrake in it. I actually used to, but now I’ve been running the Odyssey Hazard Freecoaster hub. It’s not perfect, but it’s by far the best freecoaster I’ve used. Sealed bearings, big axle, fully-loaded…thanks, Jim Bauer.–Dave

Dave, you are awesome! You have been riding longer than I have been alive, I think (16 years), and you still rip! I just wanted to know when you’re coming to Minnesota next.–Mike Hart, Woodbury, Minnesota

Hey, Mike. I really wish I could give you a definite answer, but to be honest, I have no idea. These next few months are rather busy for me with trying to get the park built and the video done, but hopefully I’ll be up there sometime after the new year to ride the Shocker with all the boys.–Dave

I never got to see you ride in Sydney on that Sunday of the bike show, but I would like to know what you thought of the parks you rode in Australia, and how was that session at Menai that Saturday night?–Ryan Harrison

I got a quick two-day tour of Australia parks that weekend from Clint Millar and friends and it was amazing. We rode old-school parks, the Bondi mini, and ditches everywhere. I’d really love to spend more time in Australia, so if you know where I can get my hands on a cheap plane ticket, give me a ring…–Dave

This is more of a comment than a question, but what the hell. Dave, you’re so tech; I love it. I loved your section in Forward and all the Road Fools you’ve done. It all kicks ass and I can’t wait to see what you come out with next. I’m one of your biggest fans.–Jon

Thanks, Jon. It’s always nice to hear from a tech fan like yourself. I just finished up filming my last few clips for Baco 10 and the MacNeil video is available now. I don’t know if my stuff is as good as the Etnies video, but I’m pretty happy with both parts so hopefully I won’t let you down. Thanks, again.–Dave

I have just gotten back from my local skatepark, APE, in the northeast of England, after hearing that the UGP team would be stopping there on their UK tour. I waited for four hours to see you guys. I didn’t think you were gonna be there, but I had this feeling that you might have tagged along on the trip after the Backyard Jam. Anyway, I was forced to go home before you turned up, and I was devastated. It was probably the only chance I’ll ever get to see my favorite rider. When I found out that you had been killing it at the park I was totally pissed off. Ah well, maybe I’ll see you at the next Backyard. The only question I wanted to ask is what did you think of the UK? More specifically, what did you think of Ape skatepark? I heard that you were shredding the spines/volcano etc. Thanks a lot for your time man, you’re the best rider in the world right now.–Dean Blackburn

Sorry, Dean. I was only on the trip for a couple of days and I had to catch my flight home. I only got to ride the park for an hour or so, but the stuff I did ride was awesome. I wasn’t a very big fan of the foam pit; to be honest, it looked pretty nasty. Hopefully I’ll get back up that way sometime next year. I know Seventies is trying to plan a MacNeil trip in the UK, so keep your ear to the ground and maybe we’ll get to meet before you know it. Thanks for the compliments.–Dave

I’ve been riding for almost a year now and I want to start doing handrails; not huge rails but little ones to start me off. I went searching for a good handrail and I found a nice one down a three-stair (don’t laugh). It’s pretty long and has no kinks. I really want to try it but it freaks me out when I roll up to it, so I was wondering if you have any tips for grinding handrails. How was it for you when you hit your first rail?–Charles

Hey, Charles. First, since you’ve only been riding a couple years, I’d definitely tell you to take it slow. Start by doing straight peg stalls on benches and flat ledges until you can consistently land on both pegs every time. Once you’ve mastered that, you’re probably ready to start jumping on smaller rails, like your three-stair. Beyond that, I’d say confidence is the key. Once you start second-guessing, you’re headed for trouble. Skatepark rails and grind bars are always a good start, too. Good luck.–Dave

Click in the “MORE” box at the top right of the page to read on…alive, I think (16 years), and you still rip! I just wanted to know when you’re coming to Minnesota next.–Mike Hart, Woodbury, Minnesota

Hey, Mike. I really wish I could give you a definite answer, but to be honest, I have no idea. These next few months are rather busy for me with trying to get the park built and the video done, but hopefully I’ll be up there sometime after the new year to ride the Shocker with all the boys.–Dave

I never got to see you ride in Sydney on that Sunday of the bike show, but I would like to know what you thought of the parks you rode in Australia, and how was that session at Menai that Saturday night?–Ryan Harrison

I got a quick two-day tour of Australia parks that weekend from Clint Millar and friends and it was amazing. We rode old-school parks, the Bondi mini, and ditches everywhere. I’d really love to spend more time in Australia, so if you know where I can get my hands on a cheap plane ticket, give me a ring…–Dave

This is more of a comment than a question, but what the hell. Dave, you’re so tech; I love it. I loved your section in Forward and all the Road Fools you’ve done. It all kicks ass and I can’t wait to see what you come out with next. I’m one of your biggest fans.–Jon

Thanks, Jon. It’s always nice to hear from a tech fan like yourself. I just finished up filming my last few clips for Baco 10 and the MacNeil video is available now. I don’t know if my stuff is as good as the Etnies video, but I’m pretty happy with both parts so hopefully I won’t let you down. Thanks, again.–Dave

I have just gotten back from my local skatepark, APE, in the northeast of England, after hearing that the UGP team would be stopping there on their UK tour. I waited for four hours to see you guys. I didn’t think you were gonna be there, but I had this feeling that you might have tagged along on the trip after the Backyard Jam. Anyway, I was forced to go home before you turned up, and I was devastated. It was probably the only chance I’ll ever get to see my favorite rider. When I found out that you had been killing it at the park I was totally pissed off. Ah well, maybe I’ll see you at the next Backyard. The only question I wanted to ask is what did you think of the UK? More specifically, what did you think of Ape skatepark? I heard that you were shredding the spines/volcano etc. Thanks a lot for your time man, you’re the best rider in the world right now.–Dean Blackburn

Sorry, Dean. I was only on the trip for a couple of days and I had to catch my flight home. I only got to ride the park for an hour or so, but the stuff I did ride was awesome. I wasn’t a very big fan of the foam pit; to be honest, it looked pretty nasty. Hopefully I’ll get back up that way sometime next year. I know Seventies is trying to plan a MacNeil trip in the UK, so keep your ear to the ground and maybe we’ll get to meet before you know it. Thanks for the compliments.–Dave

I’ve been riding for almost a year now and I want to start doing handrails; not huge rails but little ones to start me off. I went searching for a good handrail and I found a nice one down a three-stair (don’t laugh). It’s pretty long and has no kinks. I really want to try it but it freaks me out when I roll up to it, so I was wondering if you have any tips for grinding handrails. How was it for you when you hit your first rail?–Charles

Hey, Charles. First, since you’ve only been riding a couple years, I’d definitely tell you to take it slow. Start by doing straight peg stalls on benches and flat ledges until you can consistently land on both pegs every time. Once you’ve mastered that, you’re probably ready to start jumping on smaller rails, like your three-stair. Beyond that, I’d say confidence is the key. Once you start second-guessing, you’re headed for trouble. Skatepark rails and grind bars are always a good start, too. Good luck.–Dave

Click in the “MORE” box at the top right of the page to read on…>Click in the “MORE” box at the top right of the page to read on…