Children of the Corn: Meet the Striebys…

By Keith Mulligan

The Strieby brothers have been on the scene for years. But up until now, not much has been know about them or their homestead trails in Indiana. Brian, 23, is probably best known for stretching nac-nacs in dirt jumping contests (long after they were considered to be “banned”). Adam, 25, was one of the first generation of backflipers on the dirt jumping contest scene. As for Nathan, 27, he’s been known by most as “that other Strieby¿the older one.” Yes, unfortunately most people know who the Striebys are, but they don’t know which is which¿or much about them, for that matter. Hopefully this article will change all of that…

The Trails…
The Strieby’s trails sit in a wooden area on their six-acre piece of land. To sum them up in one word, they’re fun. There are big sets of doubles, the tightest turning rhythm section (a full circle with eight sets of doubles) you’ve ever seen, hips, rhythm, and a few surprises…
How long have your trails been around?
Adam: Brian always started stuff, I always finished it. They’ve been around for about 13 years. I do most of the work down there (laughter).
Nathan: About eight years in their current state. They’ve changed a lot. In the last year or two I’ve been doing a lot.Brian and Adam (yell out together): “Ohh!” (There’s a lot of laughter, Brian and Adam go on to explain that Nathan hasn’t done much over the years except pack a berm.)
How have they evolved over the years?
B: Back in the day, you’d hit one jump, a berm, hit another jump…then we added on to it. In the past five years or so we’ve tried to link ’em and have multiple sections.
N: No wide landings. If you don’t have race skills, you’re not going to have a whole lot of fun down here.
A: Last year we had more race stuff¿too technical. No one came over to ride with us (laughter), so we just rode by ourselves.
What are some of the section names?
Everyone: Circle-K, MX, Stunt Doubles, Long Rhythm, BMX, The Wall, Neal Wood’s “Jurassic Park”, he named Circle-K, too.
There are some unique things at your trails¿a wooden overpass, a vert wall, a wall ride. How’d those come about?
B: Adam’s been responsible for that kind of stuff. It just kind of appears (laughter).
N: Through the years we’ve ridden everything. It’s helped¿you hear about people getting burned-out on stuff. Sometimes we burn-out on one thing and we just go ride something else. It helps that Adam’s more into street and dirt.
B: There’re a lot of BMX jumps with different styles that haven’t been thought up yet. You’ll always have different styles, that’s why I love going to different places.
Tell me about the barn doubles.
B: It started off as a dead area. I cleared it out and built this double that was big at the time¿12 feet. Adam saw them and said we could build them bigger. They went to 21 feet, and now they’re 27.
A: Dad had us dig a basement¿hand dig it, so we started putting dirt on them. Then every year I’d build up the launch so that you couldn’t jump it¿you’d look at it and say, “There’s no way I’d jump that.” Then after half a month you’re jumping it. Then we got tired of pedaling, so we built a roll-in from the top of our house¿23 feet tall. That was rad. It was steeper than a 45-degree angle.
N: Only one other person has done it: (Scott) Yoquelet. I went down there with Brian once and we had a 15-foot height pole, he was airing five or six feet over the top of the height pole¿the bottom of his tires.
B: It’s the kind of jump that you just don’t go out and jump every day. You have people over after a race¿a hundred, two hundred people¿and everyone’s like, “Are you going to jump the barn doubles?” Then you have toump them.
Who usually rides here with you?
N: Jared, Jeremy Ball, the Goshen crew, Rhodes, Mike Schrader…
A: Yoquelet used to be the big guy.
N: Jody Donnelly back in the day, a lot of the Warsaw locals like Jeremy Lacky.
B: Cory Clark.
Do a lot of people traveling stop by?
A: (Jerry) Bagley and some guys are coming through. We’ve had a lot of guys pop in. Whitesnake comes up from Fort Wayne.
N: We used to have jams. Our first jam we had a lot of guys. The Pennsylvania guys used to come a lot.
B: That’s how PUSH got started. The original PA hardcores came over and they didn’t have any blankets, so we let them stay the night. After seeing the trails they said, “Oh, the trails are awesome! We’re going to go back and build¿we’re going to start them the next day!” So they started PUSH.
Fort Wayne had a big scene for a while. That’s pretty close to here…
N: The Ravine trails are only like 20 minutes. If you drive slow, 40 minutes. We trade off with going up there, and those guys come down here. Not a whole lot lately.
A: Yeah, it was good when that scene was going on. Basically when the Fat Bald Men moved to Fort Wayne it started getting pretty good.
B: Some people don’t like our trails ’cause they say they’re too hard. They go out to the Ravine. They just don’t have the racer skills, you know (laughter)?

He’s Going For Distance
While most people like to push their riding skills to new limits by learning new tricks, Adam has been pushing his by going for distance. He’s also pushing for a world record…
Adam, tell me about your long distance jumping.
A: I don’t know…I just decided I’d start jumping far. We wanted to build “Strieby Land” across the road. We wanted to make some crazy sections. Me and Brian were going to build a 40-foot set of doubles. I decided to toy around to get the length down, and build a launch ramp. I started going pretty far, and then decided that the world record wasn’t really all that far, so I decided I’d go for that. Every day I went over there and started jumping far. I destroyed bikes¿ripped the rear ends off of ’em (laughter). I had no case zone at all¿it was just a bunch of logs piled up. I was jumping over 50-feet every day¿trying to get over the fear of it.
N: That was without a motorcycle¿pedal power downhill.
What’s the world record?
A: To the best of my knowledge, 67-feet.
How far have you gone?
B: With or without the bike? (everyone laughs)
A: I was towed to my death¿over 60-feet… Not to death, I got right up, but it was a pretty funny looking wreck. My farthest is 59-feet. That’s without a motorcycle.
Are you going to keep going for the record? Do you think you’ll beat it?
A: Oh yeah, positively. That wreck, you’d think it would make you stop… When I landed, my whole lower body went numb, but I walked away¿I was kind of lucky. So yeah, I might as well. I went down to Texas to do it not too long go, and I jumped over 50-feet a few times, then the motorcycle guy didn’t show up. If it was up to me, we would have done it then.

The Strieby Compound
Nathan, Adam, and Brian don’t live in the big new Strieby house¿built by their dad¿on their property. They stay in a historical landmark¿an old log cabin on their land. Generations of Striebys have been born in the cabin, and plains Indians passing through have spent the night¿getting warm by the fire. It’s pretty different from most houses people live in today…
Tell me about the house you live in¿it’s an old one.
N: It’s close to 200-years-old. It’s between 180 and 210. What our trails are on, what our new house is on, is all Strieby homestead¿it’s been in our family for eight or nine generations. We used to own all the land around here. We don’t anymore, our ancestors sold it, but this is what we’ve got. This house is standing¿rent free, so it’s nice. We want to remodel it¿take it all down and re-do it. That’s a good project.
B: We’ve got our other house anyway¿the 4,000-square-foot mansion. Dad’s still working on it.
N: The Strieby Compound (laughter).
B: It’s either that or the Strieby Farm.
A: It’s cool to have this right beside the other house. We can’t live in the house or we’d freak out¿you know how it is with parents and kids.

Family
The Strieby family kids all ride BMX, and their parents are into it, too. It makes riding for them all, that much better, and their family bond even stronger…
I know your sister Judith rides. Everyone’s heard that she’s pretty good, but we didn’t get to see her today…
N: She likes to ride, but she doesn’t like people to watch her.
B: Dad doesn’t really want her to race¿our injuries have kind of scared him off.
A: We’ll meet people and he’d be like (imitating his dad), “Yeah these are our sons¿someday they’ll grow up and get real jobs…” (everyone laughs)
He’s supportive, though…
A: Oh yeah. (everyone agrees) What he’s done for the three of us, I wouldn’t do for my kids. Taking us to thirty nationals in one year¿he poured himself into us. Everything where we are, we owe to him. One year all three of us had a plate put in our bodies¿me and Brian in our ankles, and Nathan in his arm, so it’s kind of turning him¿not off to the sport¿but he doesn’t like to see us get hurt. I don’t think he wants to see his daughter get hurt. She’s pretty good, though. At the track, she rides like a guy.
N: A lot of people are freaked out about it¿because she rides in a dress. We live according to the bible¿my parents believe that she should be in a dress. She gets her shin pads and XTRSKN stuff on and goes out there and rides.
B: She can do bow-legged turnbars with the best of them. (laughter from all)
Your younger brother Luke is starting to ride now…
N: Yeah, when he’s not telling jokes or doing magic tricks (laughter). He’s never really been into it ’cause he doesn’t like to wreck. But now he’s into it.
B: We didn’t start him off or make him ride. He just wanted to ride one day. We put together an old P.K. Ripper for him.
N: We don’t push him. If he wants to ride, he wants to ride. That’s fine.
A: The coolest thing is that we’re his biggest heroes, you know? It’s a lot to live up to¿to be cool to your little brother.

Riding Together
There are strength in numbers. Having a friend or a brother as a riding companion is always good for progression, having a couple of brothers (and a sister) to keep you motivated only makes it better.
Do you push each other?
B: Definitely. I’d dial in something, Adam would come down and see me do it, and we’d have a jump-off to see who could out-do each other. Then Adam would learn something…
N: I was the first one who could do one-handed helicopters, but I quit trying to push those guys after I spent a whole day sweating, learning them. I finally got them down, and Adam was like, “Oh, I’ve never tried those.” Three jumps later he did one. I was like, “That’s it…” I can still kick his butt on a track (laughter).
A: I don’t know about that…
Who’s the fastest?
A: Brian, definitely.
B: We all have our strong points. Mine is racing, and I can jump a little. Adam definitely jtrails are on, what our new house is on, is all Strieby homestead¿it’s been in our family for eight or nine generations. We used to own all the land around here. We don’t anymore, our ancestors sold it, but this is what we’ve got. This house is standing¿rent free, so it’s nice. We want to remodel it¿take it all down and re-do it. That’s a good project.
B: We’ve got our other house anyway¿the 4,000-square-foot mansion. Dad’s still working on it.
N: The Strieby Compound (laughter).
B: It’s either that or the Strieby Farm.
A: It’s cool to have this right beside the other house. We can’t live in the house or we’d freak out¿you know how it is with parents and kids.

Family
The Strieby family kids all ride BMX, and their parents are into it, too. It makes riding for them all, that much better, and their family bond even stronger…
I know your sister Judith rides. Everyone’s heard that she’s pretty good, but we didn’t get to see her today…
N: She likes to ride, but she doesn’t like people to watch her.
B: Dad doesn’t really want her to race¿our injuries have kind of scared him off.
A: We’ll meet people and he’d be like (imitating his dad), “Yeah these are our sons¿someday they’ll grow up and get real jobs…” (everyone laughs)
He’s supportive, though…
A: Oh yeah. (everyone agrees) What he’s done for the three of us, I wouldn’t do for my kids. Taking us to thirty nationals in one year¿he poured himself into us. Everything where we are, we owe to him. One year all three of us had a plate put in our bodies¿me and Brian in our ankles, and Nathan in his arm, so it’s kind of turning him¿not off to the sport¿but he doesn’t like to see us get hurt. I don’t think he wants to see his daughter get hurt. She’s pretty good, though. At the track, she rides like a guy.
N: A lot of people are freaked out about it¿because she rides in a dress. We live according to the bible¿my parents believe that she should be in a dress. She gets her shin pads and XTRSKN stuff on and goes out there and rides.
B: She can do bow-legged turnbars with the best of them. (laughter from all)
Your younger brother Luke is starting to ride now…
N: Yeah, when he’s not telling jokes or doing magic tricks (laughter). He’s never really been into it ’cause he doesn’t like to wreck. But now he’s into it.
B: We didn’t start him off or make him ride. He just wanted to ride one day. We put together an old P.K. Ripper for him.
N: We don’t push him. If he wants to ride, he wants to ride. That’s fine.
A: The coolest thing is that we’re his biggest heroes, you know? It’s a lot to live up to¿to be cool to your little brother.

Riding Together
There are strength in numbers. Having a friend or a brother as a riding companion is always good for progression, having a couple of brothers (and a sister) to keep you motivated only makes it better.
Do you push each other?
B: Definitely. I’d dial in something, Adam would come down and see me do it, and we’d have a jump-off to see who could out-do each other. Then Adam would learn something…
N: I was the first one who could do one-handed helicopters, but I quit trying to push those guys after I spent a whole day sweating, learning them. I finally got them down, and Adam was like, “Oh, I’ve never tried those.” Three jumps later he did one. I was like, “That’s it…” I can still kick his butt on a track (laughter).
A: I don’t know about that…
Who’s the fastest?
A: Brian, definitely.
B: We all have our strong points. Mine is racing, and I can jump a little. Adam definitely jumps a lot better than me, but he needs to brush up on his racing skills (laughter). Nathan can jump and hold his own racing.
A: Nathan can announce.
N: Yeah, I can announce better than both of them.
A: We do shows and he’s our announcer. He’s been announcing at nationals a lot. Oh yeah, Linda Dorsey (NBL announcer) kissed him, too.
N: Ohh! (laughter from everyone) I don’t want to talk about that!
You’re getting red, Nathan! (laughter)
N: It was a shock, man!
A: She heard your deep voice and it was all over…
N: That’s not even funny. (more laughter from everyone)
So what does the future have in store for you guys? A lot more riding?
N: Oh yeah. We’re doing a lot of shows. I want to see us go into business for ourselves¿as a whole. I want to start a shop on my own¿whether or not these guys help out or not. That’s my thing. You can’t ride forever¿I mean, you can, but you can’t ride for your living forever. I’ve got bills. I want to get a business¿but I’m still going to ride.
A: I see the sport taking off with dirt jumping¿salaries are going up fast. Yeah, stick in the sport for as long as you can. Injuries have already accumulated, but keep going. Dave Voelker¿32.
B: Back in the day, veteran pros were 16. Maybe Harry Leary was 23-24. He’s still fast as ever, that shows you can still stay competitive as you get older. Once you have your skills down, you’ll always have it¿you’ll just have to brush up on it every now and then.
A: We’ve gone to school so we have that to fall back on.
B: The trails will always be there.
N: The trails won’t go away.
ly jumps a lot better than me, but he needs to brush up on his racing skills (laughter). Nathan can jump and hold his own racing.
A: Nathan can announce.
N: Yeah, I can announce better than both of them.
A: We do shows and he’s our announcer. He’s been announcing at nationals a lot. Oh yeah, Linda Dorsey (NBL announcer) kissed him, too.
N: Ohh! (laughter from everyone) I don’t want to talk about that!
You’re getting red, Nathan! (laughter)
N: It was a shock, man!
A: She heard your deep voice and it was all over…
N: That’s not even funny. (more laughter from everyone)
So what does the future have in store for you guys? A lot more riding?
N: Oh yeah. We’re doing a lot of shows. I want to see us go into business for ourselves¿as a whole. I want to start a shop on my own¿whether or not these guys help out or not. That’s my thing. You can’t ride forever¿I mean, you can, but you can’t ride for your living forever. I’ve got bills. I want to get a business¿but I’m still going to ride.
A: I see the sport taking off with dirt jumping¿salaries are going up fast. Yeah, stick in the sport for as long as you can. Injuries have already accumulated, but keep going. Dave Voelker¿32.
B: Back in the day, veteran pros were 16. Maybe Harry Leary was 23-24. He’s still fast as ever, that shows you can still stay competitive as you get older. Once you have your skills down, you’ll always have it¿you’ll just have to brush up on it every now and then.
A: We’ve gone to school so we have that to fall back on.
B: The trails will always be there.
N: The trails won’t go away.