History Lesson – Brian Castillo – S&M BMX Inferno – 1995

I don’t even know where to start with this one. For me personally, Brian Castillo, and the dude who made this video, Dave Parrick, were my biggest influences when I was a youngster. I was a senior in high school when S&M‘s BMX Inferno came out and I remember seeing my friend (who just got the video before me) in the hallway between classes and I asked him if Brian had a part (because that was all I really cared about). He said yes, and then he told me that he did icepick and smith grinds to no-footer. Obviously that’s not anything nowadays because the no-footer quickly got phased out by the crankflip, then the tailwhip took over soon after. But back in 1995, street riding (for the most part) was still largely comprised of people just jumping gaps and double peg grinding rails. So when Brian Castillo came along with high speed lines on flat ledges--the same kind of spots my friends and I were riding (albeit, nothing like Brian was) it was a real eye-opener. Beyond my personal influence, Brian’s BMX Inferno part influenced BMX as a whole with a few video firsts, including the manual-to-180, 360 hurricanes, icepick grind on flat ledges, and opposite icepick grinds--to no-footer, even.

A few more facts and tidbits I’ve collected about this section over the years include; the song “Retriever” is by Brian’s brother’s band (at the time) Q-Tip, and a lot of his clips were filmed at all now defunct Long Beach spots, because that’s where the filmer, Dave Parrick, lived at the time, and as Brian put it, “Parrick was too lazy to leave Long Beach, so I was forced to film there.” And lastly, being a four-piece bar fan… Brian was riding Powerlite bars for most, if not all of this video. The Powerlite bars were just like the original GT four piece, only the crossbar had a bend in it. Brian eventually moved on to the GT four-piece, then got a his own signature “Castillo Bar” with S&M, and then flipped the script with the Volume “Mad Dog” bars. Indie rock, icepick grinds, no-footers, and four-piece bars--sounds pretty damn perfect to me.