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What I Ride – Ed Zunda

WeThePeople‘s Ed Zunda is about as smooth a rider as they come and he’s got those hard spins on lock, too. Check out his signature WeThePeople Awake frame, sig WTP Awake cranks, and the rest of his blacked out hard spinning machine.

Height: 183cm [5' 11"]
Weight: Not sure, it’s been a while
Location: Latvia, Riga/Saldus
Sponsors: Wethepeople, Monster Energy, Parbmx, Vans, Mental

 

Frame: WeThePeople Awake [Ed Zunda signature], 21.15″
Fork: Eclat Coda 26mm offset
Bars: WeThePeople Buck, 9.15″
Stem: WeThePeople Hydra, 30mm rise
Grips: Dan’s [Kruk] old ones, since I ripped mine.
Barends: WeThePeople—that come with the Hilt XL grips.
Headset: WeThePeople Compact
Seatpost: WeThePeople Tripod
Seat: WeThePeople Team Tripod Mid
Pedals: BSD Safari
Cranks: WeThePeople Awake [Ed Zunda signature], 170mm
Sprocket: WeThePeople Pathfinder 25-T
Chain: Fly Traktor
Front Tire: WeThePeople Stickin’ 2.3"
Front Wheel: Mental hub with Mental plastic hubguards laced to an Animal RS rim
Rear Tire: WeThePeople Stickin’ 2.3"
Rear Wheel: WeThePeople Helix coaster, 9T, with WeThePeople plastic guards on both sides, laced to an Animal RS rim
Pegs: WeThePeople Dill Pickles 4.5″

When you were first designing your signature WeThePeople Awake frame, what were some specifics that made it your frame?
I wanted it to be responsive, strong and good looking. We went back and forth about dropout design and other small details—like gussets and headtube design—until we got the right one. I’m very excited on how it turned out!

And now that your frame has been out for over a year now, do you have any revisions in the works yet?
Yeah, we will do a few small changes—like adding classic dropouts. Making the headtube longer, so the bike could have a cleaner look without extra spacers. Little geometry changes here and there and of course new colorway. I think it will turn out amazing!

You're also running your signature Awake cranks. What are some specs/features for them that are specific to you and your riding style?
I always had a problem with cranks and my ankles—they were always bleeding and hurting, so we tried to design a crank that would be more friendly for your ankles.

You've been doing the all black setup for a bit now. Any chance of seeing some color any time soon?
Actually, I got the all black couple months back, before that I was running the trans blue and trans red colorways [laughs]. But I’m pretty sure once the first sample is out with the new colorway I’ll be more than happy to ride it!

Weren't you involved with the design of the WeThePeople Stickin' tires?
Dave from WETHEPEOPLE has always been that type of person who would check with the team, what they think about the prototype etc. First time I saw the tire I definitely agreed with him on the design and the sizes. And I'm pretty sure the rest of the dudes did too. Definitely one of my favorite tires since the day one I put them on. For me, the design plays a big role—strength of the tire and that it has a lot of grip!

Describe your bike for us… What makes it your ride?
I usually try to put my bars just a bit forward—close to be parallel to the forks, but not [laughs]. I switch my tire pressure depending on where and what I ride, but usually from 3.5 bars to 4.5 bars. I choose to ride the 2.3" tires because it feels good for hard spins. Usually I cut my bars a bit down and cut down the seatpost because there is no need to have a long one if you don’t use it all the way. Sometimes I cut my forks, that’s why we’re changing the heatube height… that’s about it

What are you most particular about on your bike?
I’d say my bars—if they move it can take me a while to put them back in the right position the way I want them to be. It’s frustrating sometimes.

How often do you work on your bike? Do you like it keep it super dialed or do you let get sloppy and just get used to it?
It all depends if I’m on a trip or home, feel like on a trip the bike wears off faster and needs to be worked on little things, like tightening the spokes and the rest of the bike, so usually twice a week or twice in two weeks—it's all about the situation. I don’t like it to be sloppy that’s for sure, but I can ride it even when something is loose… There are some things that bother me, for example… when a spoke breaks and the nipple stays in, it just sounds terrible [laughs]… gotta fix that!