Gif(t) Images: Series Five

Hey! Welcome to the fifth edition of Gif(t) Images. To simply repeat the premise: this is where I'll be giving you the gift of several GIF sequences that I've shot in recent history. You get the pun, right? Giving you a GIF image as a gift. Or something. Let's just explain the concept here… It's quite obvious that the advent of digital cameras and the rapid technical progression of BMX has left photographers shooting more sequences than ever. Sometimes those sequences are just that: a sequence of images meant to be laid next to one another. These days, though, most people try to shoot what some of you may know as a "seamless sequence" or "morph sequence." That's basically what you see directly below: several Garrett Reynolds' in one image, using the "peak action" to correctly show what went down. Much like everything in life, this is done in Photoshop. But, there's often a lot of frames that get left out of the final image. And there in lies the idea behind Gif(t) Images…

If you haven’t seen the previous Gif(t) Images, check ’em…

Fair warning: some of the GIF's are fairly large, so they've been broken into separate pages. Wait for them to load properly and every photo is available larger if you wanna click it.


You maaay have to click the photo to see the sequence…

Josh Harrington – Bar-to-pegs El Toro
I have a not-so-funny history with El Toro. I was there when Mike Brennan got broke off trying to barspin it. I was there when Dennis Enarson broke his foot trying to whip it. I was there when Brian Kachinsky bounced off the ground trying to hanger the center rail. But, I have been there to witness some triumphs, like Josh Harrington doing this bar-to-pegs. I shot a single film photo that ran in the mag, but this sequence has never been seen, I believe. Hell, I can't even remember who shot it for me, but I do remember that I didn't have a spare tripod so I made them hand-hold the camera making them promise that they wouldn't move/follow/mess up the composition and just hold down the button—they did a good job. Three tries later, Josh rode the bull down to the bottom.


You maaay have to click the photo to see the sequence…

Cory Martinez – Pegs-to-over opposite peg attempt
This was Corey Martinez's ill-fated banger for his NORA Cup winning This Is United section. It was a bit of a saga, as Corey had already done this pegs-to-over oppo ice on a kinked rail in Atlanta, but wasn't satisfied with how much of the rail he ice'd and the fact that it wasn't really filmed like a banger (you know, two angles, women crying, etc. etc.). So we headed out to that kinked rail and he gave it upwards of fifty attempts or so, most of them just peg'n the rail, but the few times Corey did pop over to the other side, it was pretty damn well set to happen—it was just a matter of time. Unfortunately that time ran out as a cop gave us the boot for not having a filming permit—which is what cops use as an excuse to kick you out when there's no signs saying you can't ride bikes, etc. I can't remember the exact circumstances, but I think Corey went back the next day and just wasn't in mode and decided to let it be.


You maaay have to click the photo to see the sequence…

Dennis Enarson – Bar into the Staples Center ledge
I'm pretty sure Dennis considers this barspin at the Staples Center to be one of the scariest things he's ever done. Originally running in his interview in the September 2010 issue, this sequence was basically a giant cluster fuck. First was the issue with security, then there was heavy and erratic traffic that Dennis had to deal with the "go, go go, wait no's" of traffic, and then on my end, half the spot was in a shadow (aka, any photographer's worst nightmare, especially a few years back when digital bodies "dynamic range" was far less forgiving). I wanted to shoot this as a seamless sequence, but for reasons that I can't justify years later, I decided to go ahead and shoot Dennis doing the bar rather zoomed in and then shoot the entire scene after the fact and piece it together. Maybe I did it to raise the quality, maybe I didn't like the way the scene looked with any of my lenses—It sounds stupid now, but whatever. I've only ever done this two other times, but I'm sure other photographers do it a lot more often for their own reasons. The pain involved with making a "seam-less" seamless sequence like this is generally enough to scare me away from doing this, but, like I said, I must have had my reasons. Anyway, the run up for this bar was completely blind and Dennis launched into it probably six or seven times before he threw the bars. Definitely one of those scenes that went from stress to elation as soon as it was all good. I don't actually have an un-cropped version of it besides this massive print proof that I shot a cell-phone photo of, but I think it's interesting enough to include to show how erratic the border is. One last thought: I don't think any photo or clip can do justice to how gnarly this bar is…you gotta see it in person.


The un-cropped version…


You maaay have to click the photo to see the sequence…

Shane Weston – 180-to-fakie cannonball
This 180-to-fakie cannonball of Shane Weston was shot during the Fly trip to Cali. There's no crazy story, but there are a couple of things worth noticing… First, the shake in the sequence because I always use a relatively cheap tripod and if you watch Shane's Welcome To Fly edit, you'll notice that he's wearing a different shirt. Wanna know why? It's because I Photoshop'd his shirt yellow because I thought it'd pop better. Not really. The truth is actually a slightly more unbelievable; all the footage from the Cali trip was lost when filmer Lee Turner checked his hard drive and some scumbag TSA agent stole it. Shane ended up flying back out to Cali and re-filming several of the same tricks over again for his welcome edit. Wild.


You maaay have to click the photo to see the sequence…

Garrett Reynolds – Nose bonk bar
Here's another sequence that's never been seen before. Garret Reynolds doing this wild nose bonk bar way back in April of 2010. We shot this on a Deadline trip where we went from Atlanta and through North Carolina…or something like that. You can see that I'm actually in this (red shirt and green shoes, makes sense), so I must have set this on a tripod for one of the dudes to hold the button, probably mostly out of paranoia because I was actually shooting a black and white film sequence (unheard of after 2002) for some reason. More than likely just because I thought it would look cool and I knew Garrett would fire it out relatively quickly, which he did around third or fourth try. This clip, of course, is in his Deadline section and rightfully so, because this really was one of the wildest things I shot around that time. I talked about it for months afterwards.